Pennsylvania Department of Education

 






Description: PDE Logo

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Department of Education
333 Market Street
Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333







Special Education Report
Thursday, April 25, 2013
(Last Approved: Wednesday, June 22, 2011)

Entity: Chester-Upland SD
Address: 1720 Melrose Ave
Chester, PA 19013-5837
Phone: (610) 490-3388
Contact Name: Rachel Foster


School District Demographics

School District

IU #

Superintendent

# of Bldgs

Total Enrollment

Total Unduplicated SES Students

Chester-Upland SD

Delaware County IU 25

Dr. Thomas Persing

8 schools in 7 buildings

2,806

618 as od 12/1/12


District Special Education Contact:

Name

Title

Phone

Fax

Email

Andrea Saia

Assistant Superintendent for Pupil Services and Special Education

610-447-3427

610-499-2683

asaia@chesteruplandsd.org

Special Education Plan Team Members

Name

Affiliation

Membership Category

Appointed By

Boneparte, Pauline

CUSD

Parent

Levi Wingard, Acting Superintendent

Foster, Rachel

CUSD

Administrator

Levi Wingard, Acting Superintendent

Mongoni, Lisa

Chester Upland School District

Regular Education Teacher

Thomas Persing, Acting Superintendent

Payne, Mary

CUSD

Administrator

Levi Wingard, Acting Superintendent

Peltier, Nancy

Chester Upland School District

Regular Education Teacher

Thomas Persing, Acting Superintendent

Raiders, Susan

Chester Upland School District

Administrator

Thomas Persing, Acting Superintendent

Saia,Andria

Chester Upland School District

Administrator

Thomas Persing, Acting Superintendent

Smith, Catherine

Chester Upland School District

Administrator

Thomas Persing Acting Superintendent

Vaughn, Stevenson

CUSD

Administrator

Levi Wingard, Acting Superintendent

Program Evaluation (P.L. 105-17, §612(2) and §613(a))

Current Program Strengths and Highlights

     The Chester Upland School District has gone through four re-organizations over the last two years. We currently operate four Elementary schools including Columbus Elementary at Toby Farms, Stetser Elementary, Main Street Elementary, and The Chester Upland School for the Arts. We also operate two Intermediate Schools those being Showalter Intermediate School and Toby Farms Intermediate School and two high schools those being Chester High School and the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math High School.

  The District is planning on another re-organization for the beginning of the 2013-2014 school year and the aforementioned organizational pattern will change over the summer of 2013.   

     A major highlight of Chester Upland School District's continuing program development in Special Education is a strong emphasis on ensuring that a free appropriate public education in the Least Restrictive Environment is provided to all students consistent with federal and state legislation, as well as with such judicial milestones as Oberti and Gaskin.  With the assistance of the Delaware County Intermediate Unit (DCIU), the Pennsylvania Training & Technical Assistance Network (PaTTAN), lecturers whose specialites are special education, special education law, and behavior, the District has focused programs and staff developments on Least Restrictive Environment, inclusionary practices, RtI, compliance and the use of supplementary aids and services.

     A related strength of this Special Education program is a clear commitment to resolving any dispute at an early stage in the resolution process.  All concerned stress the importance and necessity of conjoint decision-making, productive compromise, and exploration of creative solutions, in the best interests of the student. This year the District has elicited parent involvement through normal IEP meetings as well as PTAs, the Local Task Force, a cooperative Parent Summit with Title One and a series of informational parent workshops.    

    Related services are a clear strength of this Special Education program.  It is not uncommon for students to require additional support services on the road to learning, growing, socializing and becoming contributing members of society.  These supportive services are currently provided by a team of psychologists, and social workers; speech and language therapists; and of contracted occupational and physical therapists working seamlessly with the District.  They are proactive in their philosophy in meeting the needs of all students.  Counselors, psychologists, social workers and nurses provide a network of highly trained professionals to counsel students and their families, connect students and care givers to program services, assess levels of learning, support the physical and mental health of students, provide training to staff throughout the District to better interact and benefit students and their families.  

  In an effort to reduce the number of students placed out of district who have a diagnoses of Autistic Spectrum Disorder, the CUSD Autistic Support Program  consists of four classrooms at the Elementary level and one at the secondary level. These programs are committed to working with families to provide a program that best meets the student’s individual needs, and working towards placement in the least restrictive environment.  We offer our students a variety of support opportunities designed to assist students as they age out of the primary program to move into the Intermediate level.  


     Transition Services have long been a highlight of Special Education in Chester Upland School District, going well beyond basic compliance with federal and state law.  An outcome-based program, Transition Services offer options at each grade level from 9 through 12 for students who experience barriers  moving smoothly into employment and other post-high school situations.  In grade 9, students sample various Career and Technical Education classes by rotating through them.  Grade 10's Career Awareness classes offer guided learning as well as expose to the real world of work via speaker and field trips to community businesses.  In grades 11 and 12, students are provided with incentives and job coaching for hands-on, job-readiness experiences in the workforce; tour of post-secondary institutions; and specific linkages to appropriate community agencies.  At each grade level, standardized or performance-based assessments are provided to the IEP team to aid in appropriate individualized programming.  Since the 2007-2008 school year, students have utilized the Career Development Checklist as part of the IEP process upon turning 14 years of age.  This checklist enables students to make career choices that are aligned to their strengths and interests.  Concurrently, Special Education Teachers utilize the "Future Planning Strategy" Checklist to guide students in their transition planning.  Through these practical school-to-work applications, as well as non-traditional scheduling of time in the workplace, many students who might otherwise drop out remain in school to graduate and move successfully into adult life.

   In January 2013 the District reinstituted a home living component of the Life Skills program by opening a simulated apartment setting at the Chester High School.This is a life-skills initiative specially designed to provide a natural environment where students can develop daily routines, express individuality, and share a sense of ownership in the community.  As a result, the students in the program will learn the necessary skills, habits, appitudes, and attitudes for employment, everyday living, and community access before and after graduation from high school. During the Spring of 2013 this will be expanded to include a kitchen and the Life Skills affiliated with activities relevant to that setting. 

Identifying Students with Learning Disabilities

     The Chester Upland School District is committed to working with parents to provide our students with quality educational experiences that will encourage them to be successful learners.  In some cases, a student with a disability may require special education in order to benefit from their educational experience.  The Chester Upland School District currently educates approximately 600 exceptional students in district in a full continuum of services offered in its nine schools and one alternative educational program.  

     The School-Based Solutions/SAP Team is a discrepancy/intervention process that provides support for students who are struggling, academically, socially, and emotionally and/or who have attendance/tardiness problems and have received a warning/interim notice of failure.  Parents are encouraged to be active members of these teams.  Meetings are held to analyze students' learning difficulties and to develop strategies to help students in their regular education classes. 

    Students who may require special education services are referred by the School-Based Solutions/SAP Team for a multidisciplinary evaluation of their learning needs.  This evaluation gathers pertinent information on the child's performance from teachers, counselors, behavior health liaisons, psychologists, and parents.  When necessary, information is compiled into a comprehensive evaluation report that includes recommendations on the child's eligibility for Special Education Services.  All information collected is protected in accordance with State and Federal law and by the District's policy on confidentiality of student records.  The initial involvement of the School-Based Solutions/SAP Team however, is recommended to be an important first step in assessing a student's educational strengths and needs.      

    

Enrollment Differences

 

Not significantly disproportionate.

Ethnicity Enrollment Differences

 

Not significantly disproportionate.

24 P.S., §1306 and §1306.2 Placements

Facilities for Nonresident Students

Facility Name

Provider of Educational Services

# of Students Receiving Srvcs as of Dec 1

Crozer Child Adolescent Behavioral Unit, Crozer-Chester Medical Center

SD

350

Nonresident Students Oversight

   Ensuring FAPE to Nonresident Students in Institutions BEC (24 P.S. §13-1306) is achieved by the Chester Upland School District through our commitment to utilize resources such as Child Find which assists us in seeking out and identifying all children between age five and 21 years of age who may need special education and/or related services to address problems that might interfere with their future development and learning. The district has a Special Education Teacher assigned part time to the residential facility where non resident students reside. She provides approrpiate educational services to the students there based upon the information we receive. Many students there are placed for a short period of time(1 to 10 days). Students staying for longer periods of time go through regular Child Find activities through the Special Education department. When a student remains for a longer period of time, this assigned special education teacher works closely with our child accounting department to determine the students home district. At that time the Home District is contacted to determine the student's educational status(i.e.- Special Education or Regular Education) and obtain records to support the longer term educational program. Once the records are obtained FAPE in the appropriate LRE is determined and provided. If an updated Evaluation is needed or IEP needs to be developed the District Team completes the necessary due process procedures. 

Facilities for Incarcerated Students

Facility Name

Provider of Educational Services

# of Students Receiving Srvcs as of Dec 1

Incarcerated Students Oversight

     In order to ensure that all incarcerated students who may be eligible for special education are located, identified, evaluated, and when deemed eligible, are offered FAPE, the District relies upon our Out of District liaison to monitor and communicate with the placements where students are incarcerated. Most of these students are in local facilities, but some are placed farther away. The Out of District liaison monitors these in the most appropriate manner available.

 Most of our incarcerated students are in local facilities and their needs are met through services provided by the Alternative Education Programs of the Delaware County Intermediate Unit.  DCIU provides educational programs in our two local correctional institutions, the Delaware County Juvenile Detention Center and the Delaware County Prison, performing all special education functions.

    Very close communication is maintained with DCIU's Alternative Education Programs.  Information is faxed to the District about entry and exit, as well as grades earned during incarceration, for all special education students.  The District provides special education records to the Alternative Education Programs and access to IEP Writer which is our secure, web-based site for Special Education documents to monitor and track student IEP data. When Special Education students who are inmates of the Delaware County Prison become eligible for graduation, representatives from the District meet with representatives from the DCIU Alternative Education Programs to ensure that such graduation ensues.  If the incarcerated student has completed graduation requirements and is released from prison in time, he/she is eligible to participate in all District graduation activities. Formerly incarcerated students who have not earned enough credits for graduation are transitioned back into district placement through a formal meeting process of the Solutions/SAP Team and appropriate Special Education Staff.

Students placed in facilities farther away can be more difficult to monitor. The District has provided contact information for our Out of District liaison to agencies including Juvenile Probation, Children Youth and Famlies, and Mental Health providers in order to facilitate communication with facilities of incarceration. This has started to improve services at those facilities as well as to support appropriate services at the time of discharge.

Least Restrictive Environment 34 CFR §300.114

Ensuring Maximum Integration

     In accordance with IDEA, the Chester Upland School District continues to provide screenings and evaluations, appropriate programs and services to all students identified as being exceptional and in need of specially designed instruction.  These services are available without cost to parents.

The District provides a wide of options in it's buildings in order to facilitate the integration of children with disabilities. We operate many of our own low incidence programs including Life Skills Support, Autistic Support and Emotional Support. In addition to this, our staff, both Special Education and General Education receive ongoing inservice on providing appropriate adaptions and accomodations for these individual populations. These inservices are provided by District, IU, PATTAN and State personnel as well as private service providers.The Special Education budget provides for all necessary aides and services to facilitate the needed instruction.

An LEA attends all IEP meetings both in and out of the District to ensure children with disabilities are educated with non disabled peers to the maximum extent possible. Particular attention is paid to those students in out of district placements to ensure they are transitioned back to less restrictive placements as soon as possible.

  
      One of the agenda items of our first Special Education Parent Advisory Meeting of each new school year includes information on Least Restrictive Environment and Supplementary Aids and Services are provided along with a SAS Tool worksheet and the Gaskin Settlement Agreement Fact Sheet.  
 

Supplementary Aids and Services

Service/Resource

Description

Libraries

Chester Upland School district feature a web-based student friendly library system called Destiny in all district schools. The Destiny System is designed to strengthen the library/classroom connection: match titles to students’ reading levels, align collection materials to standards, provide safe web searching, and streamline cataloging of non-print materials. 

Adult Basic Education & GED

The district seeks to provide extended learning opportunities for adults who wish to continue their education and improve their basic academic skills while attaining a high school diploma and workforce readiness.

Alternative Education

The mission of the Alternative Education Program is to provide a high quality educational program in a learning environment that provides emotional, social, and intellectual support to challenging learners in a supportive atmosphere. Instruction is designed to enhance the quality of life for students who are high risk for potential exclusion from mainstream traditional educational programs.

 

Anti-Bullying Policy - "Value Yourself, Value Others"

It is the policy of the Chester Upland School District to maintain learning environments that are free from harassment or bullying based on an individual’s real or perceived race, color, sex, religion, creed, political belief, age, national origin, linguistic or language differences, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression (this includes gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered students), socioeconomic status, neighborhood or public housing affiliation or status, special education designation, parental status or physical, mental, or sensory disability.

The Chester Upland School District Board prohibits any and all forms of harassment or bullying on School District property or School District-sanctioned events. This policy also covers any actions that occur while a student is traveling to and from school, and any bullying activity that occurs through any electronic means – even though it may not take place in a school setting.

Bullying is prohibited under Rule 19 of the Chester Upland School District Code of Student Conduct.

These acts include, but are not limited to:

Direct Bullying

Physical- hitting, kicking, punching, shoving, spitting. Verbal- using a racial or sexual comment, name-calling, teasing, taunting, threatening. Non-verbal- obscene gestures, stalking.

Indirect Bullying

Physical- getting another person to assault someone. Verbal- spreading rumors, gossip. Non-verbal- cyber-bullying; bullying that occurs by use of electronic devices through means of email, instant messaging, text messages, blogs, mobile phones, telephones, pagers, websites, two-way pagers, or through use of you-tube video, or any other electronic means.

Athletics Expansion to Middle Years Students

Middle years students have the opportunity to participate in football, soccer, volleyball, basketball, cheerleading, baseball, softball, and track. These programs will create increased opportunities for students to participate in extracurricular sports activities. In addition, it will do the following: raise the academic and behavior expectations of student athletes; increase good behavior by using high standards for participation in athletics; and improve social emotional and physical development of student athletes. To participate students must have: good grades, good behavior, and desire. High school sports will be expanded to include Volleyball. Clinics and camps will be offered to interested students

Career & Technical Education

Students in the Career & Technical Education program may earn the following Industry Certifications: ServeSafe (culinary), OPAC (business program), Cosmetology State Board exam, SP2 (automotive), and NOCTI(National Occupational Competency Testing Institute) exam.  

The Chester Upland School District Automotive program is an approved and designated NATEF training site. The purpose of the automotive technician training certification program is to improve the quality of training offered at secondary and post-secondary, public and proprietary schools. 

We also are in partnership with our city housing authority in which students have been placed in the housing authority for co-op opportunities. Our Early Childhood program seeks to be licensed through the Department of Public Welfare. Our goal is to get the program licensed and star rated.

The Valley Forge Educational Services provides professional development for all of the CTE instructors; these professional developments include lessons on differentiated instruction, curriculum design, and working with the PA academic standards.

Clubs

Chester Upland School District seeks to help our students develop new skills and interest in a unique learning environment that will stimulate curiosity while reinforcing essential academic learning experiences that are culturally and socially enriching. Extracurricular programs like clubs are designed to provide opportunities not typically experienced during the school day. These are some of the clubs offered in the district: arts & crafts, cheerleading, dance, debate team, drum line, fine arts, gardening, Hi Q, knitting, Reading Olympics, robotics, mural arts, newspaper, and more.

College Access Centers

Chester Upland has doubled its college access opportunities for all high school students. To assist with college readiness, the district will offer additional support in the instructional programs. Literacy will be taught by a college professor, Academic Seminar and Power Mathematics 2 classes will be taught by high school instructors. The objective of the College Access centers is to promote a college going culture among our students and their families and postsecondary support through career and workforce development opportunities. Students will experience PSAT and SAT preparation, FAFSA assistances, college tours and fairs and career readiness skills.

Community Partnerships

Chester Upland School District partners with approximately 40 entities who provide various supports to our students, staff and community educationally, spiritually, recreationally and for our wellbeing.

Credit Recovery Program

The Credit Recovery Program allows high school students to attend a six-week program in order to obtain credits for up to three failing courses.

EARLY CHILDHOOD (Pre-Kindergarten)

The Chester Upland School District is committed to providing the youngest members of our community with a pre-kindergarten program of the highest quality. It is our belief all children can and will be successful today and in the future if provided with an engaging, active, learning environment.

English Language Learners [ELL]

The District is committed to providing academic and social emotional support to its Limited English Proficient (LEP) students. Through this commitment, the District will foster an educational environment whereby, LEP students develop skills using the native language as necessary to support the acquisition of academic content, while they are developing their English language proficiency. Interpreters are available for translation services.

Extended School Year (ESY)

The District ESYprogram encompasses special education students who have received programming within the CUSD during the regular school year and who have qualified for ESY as per State Regulation Chapter 14.132. These students are in need of supports beyond those provided within the school year.  Students may be mentally retarded, autistic, serious emotional disturbed, or multiply disabled.

Home Study

Tutoring in the home is designed to assist students who have been expelled from school. Parents have a 30 day period to request educational assistance from the school district. Requests are made to central office. Expelled student will be tutored in their home or in a public place such as a local library, college library or community center. Central administration will assign a teacher to a student. Teachers will have identification. Students who are expelled for the school year will be pre and post tested. To determine a student’s eligibility for promotion, attendance must be 95%, grades must be C or better, and progress/ growth will be determined by district assessments. These indicators will be submitted to the coordinator of alternative education.

Homebound Instruction

Homebound Instruction is an extended learning opportunity offered to students who have a medical condition that necessitates instruction in the home. A request for homebound instruction must be signed by licensed medical practitioner (doctor) showing evidence that a student is unable to attend school. Parents must request homebound instruction from the school where their child attends school.

Homeless Support

Children and youth (age 21 and under) who lack a "fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence" are considered homeless.  Students have the right to remain in the school of origin for the duration of homelessness.  Feasible transportation is provided as well as clothing allowance, food allowance and school supplies with discretion may be provided if other sources are unavailable.

Mentoring for 1st Year Teachers

Mentors with documented successful teaching experience of three years or more within the Chester Upland School District are selected to mentor new teachers.  Mentors meet with their assigned new teacher at least two times per month for coaching and support.  Mentors are required to attend training sessions to enhance their knowledge and skill in coaching.

Mobile Teaching Carts

CUSD schools have mobile technology carts and Promethean Boards designed to increase opportunities for teachers to integrate technology into their instruction and for students to have access to multiple web-based instructional programs, resources and aids.

New Teacher Induction

CUSD provides a series of six sessions for first-year teachers and those teachers who need to complete the PDE induction requirement.  Topics include Classroom Management, Effective Teaching of African American Children and Children of Poverty, Teaching with the Brain in Mind and Active Teaching Strategies.

Nursing services, Speech, Language and Pathology services, Occupational and Physical Therapy services

CUSD students are provided with multiple services to support their wellness, and ultimately, academic needs.

Parent Summit

Chester Upland School District offers two Parent Summits (Fall and Spring) per school year.  The purpose of the summits are to highlight all of the services and resources the district has to offer.  Keynote speakers, workshops, giveaways/door prizes, community programs and vendor information, moon bounces, face painting, student performances, free refreshments are just some of the highlights of the summits.  All members of the community are invited to attend.

Physical Supports

To address students who are deaf, blind or visually impaired, or in need of physical support, have multiple disabilities, or autism spectrum disorders, students are provided with furniture arrangement, specific seating arrangements, individualized desk, chair, adaptive equipment, adjustments to sensory input (light, sound), environmental aids (classroom acoustics, heating, ventilation), structural aids (wheelchair accessibility, trays, grab bars), occupational and physical therapy, orientation and mobility services, and assistive technology services.  We currently have two elementary schools and one high school that are handicapped accessible.

Programs and Services

A team of people knowledgeable about the student is formed to decide what kinds of programs and services are appropriate based on the student's unique learning needs. Eligible students are entitled to specially-designed instruction that is conducted in the classroom, at home, in community settings, hospitals, institutions, and other settings. Related services, including transportation and developmental, and corrective services are provided.

Project ELECT (Education Leading to Employment and Career Training) & TAPP (Teenage Pregnancy and Parenting Program

Sponsored by the Delaware County Intermediate Unit, Project ELECT is a program available to CUSD students that assists eligible pregnant and parenting teens in breaking the cycle of welfare dependency by remaining in school, obtaining a GED or high school diploma, transitioning into employment, job training, or post-secondary education and parenting healthy children.

Project Forward Leap

This program is a college experience for students in elementary school, grade 5. Selected students spend 5 weeks away from home on a different college each summer until their 8th grade year. The program provides academic, social and cultural development for the students in Chester Upland.

Services for Students with Disabilities

Programs and services are available to students with disabilities that are in a:

  • regular class placement for most of the school day with instruction provided by a special education teacher in a resource classroom
  • part-time special education class in a regular public school or alternative setting
  • regular class placement for most of the school day with itinerant service by a special education teacher either in or out of the regular classroom
  • regular class placement with supplementary aids and services provided as need in that environment
  • special education class receiving special education services outside the regular class for most or all of the school day, either in a regular public school or alternative setting

Social and Behavioral

Designed to address the needs of students who need assistance with social and or emotional development (emotional support), support is provided in the following areas: social skills instruction, counseling supports, peer supports (facilitating friendships), individualized behavior support plans, modification of rules and expectations, cooperative learning strategies. Group and individual counseling, social workers,  counselors, and mental health teams are in place to facilitate this process.

Summer Programs

The purpose of summer school is to provide meaningful engagement time and extended learning opportunity for all students who attend Chester Upland schools. First time kindergarten students, special needs ESY students, regular education enrichment students and high school students with failing grades all benefit from the district’s summer school programs.

Supplemental Education Services (SES)

Chester Upland School District is an SES provider and will provide tutoring support for our students district wide. Parents have an opportunity to choose from over 25 educational providers at no additional cost.

Ti-Nspire

Every high school mathematics class is equipped with a set of the latest handheld technology to enhance the learning experience of our students.

Tutoring Support

Chester Upland provides tutoring support to students in elementary, middle and high school 9th graders during the school day. Students receive reading and mathematics support to improve their academic achievement levels.

LRE Data Analysis

 

Personnel Development Activities

Topic: Least Restrictive Environment (LRE)

Anticipated Training Dates

Training Partners

Training Participants and Audience

Training Format

Evidence of Results

Ongoing Professional Development Dates as follows: 10/13; 11/13; 1/14; 2/14; 3/14; 5/14; 10/14; 11/14; 2/15; 3/15; 5/15; 10/15; 11/15; 2/16; 3/16; 5/16

PATTAN Staff, IU Staff, Professional Speakers

New Staff, Paraprofessional, Instructional Staff, Administrative Staff, Related Service Personnel

On-site Training with Guided Practice, Workshops with Joint Planning Periods, Conferences, Distance Learning

The expected outcomes are an increase in the use of evidence-based instructional strategies that positively affect academic achievement for all students. The district established more classes that are designed to meet the various needs of students attending schools within the district in order to reduce out of district placements, including an Ombudsman program and a virtual school. This area was addressed through an improvement plan developed after the 2009-2010 cylindrical monitoring of the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE), resulting in the creation and implementation of the special education action plan to ensure consistency, appropriate programming and compliance.

Presently, the highest number of students receiving services in out-of-district placements are included in the following categories: Severe Emotional Disability, Mental Disability, and Autism (secondary).
The district has improved its Emotional Support Program by providing strategies and resources to meet the needs of students within this exceptionality area. The District aslo intends to begin an Intensive Tier three program to meet the Mental Health needs of these students beginning at the start of the 2013-2014 program. Tha District also plans to bring on additional Mental Health services for the Middle and Elementary Emotional Support services during the 2013-2014 school year. While we currently service over 50 studnets with Emotional and Mental Health services in the District we look to sustantially increase these enrollment figures with the new Mental Health services next year.
We have also added three Elementary Autism Support classes and one Middle School Autistic Support class to address the needs of students who have Autism Spectrum Disorders. Life Skills Classes are operated at all levels to maintain this low incidence population in the Least Restrictive Environment also. These efforts have resulted over 60 students enrolled in these district programs in the 2012-2013 school year.

In the 2011-2012 academic year, the district fully implemented a district-wide inclusion program. Based upon this implementation, student placement in the regular education setting has increased; student placement in the special education settings has decreased.

For the following student populations, the district has established the following goals for the 2012-2013, and 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 school years:
1) Students inside the Regular Education Classroom less than 40% of the day: The goal is to decrease student placement by 20% each year for the next three years. Currently, CUSD is approximately 11% above the state target.
2) Students inside the Regular Education Classroom more than 80% of the day: The goal is to increase student placement by 50% over the next three years. Currently, CUSD is approximately 20% below the state target.
3) Students in Out-of-District placements: The goal is to decrease students going to out-of-district placements by 10% each year for the next three years. Currently, CUSD is approximately 6% above the state target.

Least Restrictive Environment - Facilities

Facility Name

Type of Facility

Type of Service

# of Students Placed

Buxmont Academy

Other

Alternative Placement

1

Springton Lake Middle School

Neighboring School Districts

AS

2

Devereux Day

Approved Private Schools

AS/PDD, NI, SED

2

Devereux Kanner

Approved Private Schools

AS/PDD, NI, SED

3

Valley Day School

Approved Private Schools

AS/PDD, NI, SED

2

Vanguard School

Approved Private Schools

AS/PDD, NI, SED

4

Wordsworth Academy

Approved Private Schools

AS/PDD, NI, SED

10

Elwyn-Davidson

Approved Private Schools

AS/PDP, BVIS, DHIS, MR, NI, SED

22

Overbrook School for the Blind

Approved Private Schools

BVIS

6

Delaware County Technical High School

Other

Career & Technical

5

George Crothers Memorial School

Approved Private Schools

CP, MR, NI

12

Strathaven High School

Neighboring School Districts

DHIS

1

PA School for the Deaf

Approved Private Schools

DHIS

5

Community School

Other

ES

5

County Alternative High School

Neighboring School Districts

ES

11

The Pilot School

Out-of-State Schools

Learning Differences

1

Pennington School

Neighboring School Districts

MDS

2

Penncrest High School

Neighboring School Districts

PS

6

Martin Luther School

Approved Private Schools

SED

1

Pathway School

Approved Private Schools

AS/PDD,NI,SED

4

Devereaux-Mapleton

Approved Private Schools

AS/PDD, NI, SED

2

Woods Services

Approved Private Schools

NI

1

Southwood RTF

Other

LS

1

Hoffman Homes RTF

Other

LS

1

Royer-Greaves School for the Blind

Approved Private Schools

BVIS, DHIS

1

George Hill Correctional Institute

Neighboring School Districts

LS

12

Glen Mills School

Neighboring School Districts

LS

2

Abraxas

Neighboring School Districts

ES

1

Personnel Development for Improved Student Results

Personnel Development - PA NCLB Goal #1

Reflections

·         PSSA & Teacher Experience

Strength Concern Last Modified: 6/19/2012

PSSA & Teacher Experience

Overall reading performance on the PSSA improved from 2008 to 2010 in grades 4, 6, 7, 8, and 11.

In 2011, gains continued in grades 4 and 6. Reading scores showed the following changes by grade level:

·    At Grade 3, the District showed a loss of 2 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 2 percentage points.

·    At Grade 4, the District had a gain of 3 percentage points compared no change to the statewide score.

·    At Grade 5, the District showed no change compared to a statewide gain of 3 percentage points.

·    At Grade 6, the District had a gain of 3 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 3 percentage points.

·    At Grade 7, the District had a loss of 5 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 3 percentage points.

·    At Grade 8, the District had a loss of 3 percentage points compared to no change statewide.

·    At Grade 11, the District had no change compared to a statewide gain of 2 percentage points.

Overall mathematics performance on the PSSA has improved from 2008 to 2010 in grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 11.

In 2011, gains continued in grades 6, 8 and 11. Mathematics scores showed the following changes by grade level:

·    At Grade 3, the District had a loss of 1 percentage point compared to a statewide loss of 1 percentage point.

·    At Grade 4, the District had no change compared to a statewide gain of 1 percentage point.

·    At Grade 5, the District had a loss of 4 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 2 percentage points.

·    At Grade 6, the District had a gain of 7 percentage points compared to no change statewide.

·    At Grade 7, the District had a loss of 3 percentage points compared to no change statewide.

·    At Grade 8, the District had a gain of 11 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 1 percentage point.

·    At Grade 11, the District had a gain of 8 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 1 percentage point.

There is evidence of inconsistent instructional practices across district classrooms, as well as a lack of accountability for the implementation of new learning from Professional Development experiences. It is unclear what standards-based literacy and math instructional practices are implemented with fidelity by district teachers, and due to recent budget cuts, CUSD has few resources (especially people and time) to consistently track implementation. School staff is proficient in understanding data but not yet confident in using it to monitor and adjust instructional practices. Additionally, no time is available within the school day for staff collaboration or in-classroom modeling and coaching as a result of the elimination of Common Planning Time and the positions of school Facilitators (Learning Coaches) due to budget cuts.

Base Line Data

Reading

Thirty-six percent of all students within the district scored Proficient or Advanced as measured by the 2010 PSSA Reading Assessment. The following results indicate the overall percentages of students scoring Proficient or Advanced by grade level: 3rd — 46.7, 4th — 33.2, 5th — 27.3, 6th — 31.7, 7th — 40.7, 8th — 45.5, 11th — 24.1.

 Overall results for student with IEPs who completed the 2010 PSSA Reading Assessment are as follows: Advanced — 5.9%, Proficient — 6.8%, Basic — 15.3%, Below Basic — 72%.

 To address deficits in reading for our Special Education population, the district implements a comprehensive literacy curriculum (Language!) for students in grades 3-12 who are reading two or more years below grade level. The program identifies the exact skills that students struggle with so that instruction can be geared to meeting each student’s needs. The program systematically teaches the five essential components of reading (phonics, phonemic awareness, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension) and connects them to writing. It provides embedded professional development, modeling and coaching for teachers. In addition to the district’s literacy curriculum, we offer an intervention which helps students become better, more fluent and proficient readers, Achieve3000.

 The district also offers Wilson Tutoring for students in grades 2-12 in the lowest 30th percentile who have decoding and spelling deficits and have been unsuccessful in other programs. Wilson offers a 12-step program that incorporates the essential components of reading through a multi-sensory approach. Lessons are planned based on specific student needs.

 

Mathematics

Thirty-seven percent of all CUSD students scored Proficient or Advanced as measured by the 2010 PSSA Mathematics Assessment. The following results indicate the overall percentages of students scoring Proficient or Advanced by grade level: 3rd — 58.1, 4th — 53, 5th — 41.4, 6th — 46, 7th — 33.5, 8th — 16.6, 11th — 7.2.

 Overall results for student with IEPs who completed the 2010 PSSA Mathematics Assessment are as follows: Advanced — 8.5%, Proficient — 7.3%, Basic — 13.7%, Below Basic — 70.6%.

 The district uses the Everyday Math curriculum in grades K-6. This program is aligned to state standards and incorporates the use of manipulatives, math games and daily math messages to increase student mastery, math objectives and eligible content. The district uses standards-aligned math curricula in grade 7-12. In addition to Everyday Math, the district uses three interventions to address mathematics deficits. Students in grades K-9 also use the First in Math program which is designed to help students practice computation and measurement. Students in grades 5-12 use Apangea, which is specifically focused on teaching mathematics problem solving and critical thinking skills. The district also uses Mobius, a math intervention which helps students find solutions to problems through multiple approaches.

Personnel Development Activities

Topic: Reading

Anticipated Training Dates

Training Partners

Training Participants and Audience

Training Format

Evidence of Results

Ongoing Professional Development Dates as follows: 10/11; 11/11; 1/12; 2/12; 3/12; 5/12; 10/12; 11/12; 2/13; 3/13; 5/13; 10/13; 11/13; 2/14; 3/14; 5/14

IU Staff, Higher Education Staff

Parent, New Staff, Paraprofessional, Instructional Staff

On-site Training with Guided Practice, Workshops with Joint Planning Periods, Conferences

2011-2012

2% increase in Reading PSSA scores at the 5th, 8th and 11th grade levels

2% increase in Reading 4-Sight scores at the 3rd-11th grade levels

3% increase in the high school graduation rate

2012-2013

An additional 2% increase in Reading PSSA scores at the 5th, 8th and 11th grade levels

An additional 2% increase in Reading 4-Sight scores at the 3rd-11th grade levels

An additional 3% increase in the high school graduation rate

2013-2014

An additional 2% increase in Reading PSSA scores at the 5th, 8th and 11th grade levels

An additional 2% increase in Reading 4-Sight scores at the 3rd-11th grade levels

An additional 3% increase in the high school graduation rate

 

Topic: Math

Anticipated Training Dates

Training Partners

Training Participants and Audience

Training Format

Evidence of Results

Ongoing Professional Development Dates as follows: 10/11; 11/11; 1/12; 2/12; 3/12; 5/12; 10/12; 11/12; 2/13; 3/13; 5/13; 10/13; 11/13; 2/14; 3/14; 5/14

IU Staff, Higher Education Staff

Parent, New Staff, Paraprofessional, Instructional Staff, Administrative Staff

On-site Training with Guided Practice, Conferences

2011-2012

2% increase in Math PSSA scores at the 5th, 8th and 11th grade levels

2% increase in Math 4-Sight scores at the 3rd-11th grade levels

3% increase in the high school graduation rate

2012-2013

An additional 2% increase in Math PSSA scores at the 5th, 8th and 11th grade levels

An additional 2% increase in Math 4-Sight scores at the 3rd-11th grade levels

An additional 3% increase in the high school graduation rate

2013-2014

An additional 2% increase in Math PSSA scores at the 5th, 8th and 11th grade levels

An additional 2% increase in Math 4-Sight scores at the 3rd-11th grade levels

An additional 3% increase in the high school graduation rate

Qualified Staff

Reflections

·         PSSA & Teacher Experience

Strength Concern Last Modified: 6/19/2012

PSSA & Teacher Experience

Overall reading performance on the PSSA improved from 2008 to 2010 in grades 4, 6, 7, 8, and 11.

In 2011, gains continued in grades 4 and 6. Reading scores showed the following changes by grade level:

·    At Grade 3, the District showed a loss of 2 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 2 percentage points.

·    At Grade 4, the District had a gain of 3 percentage points compared no change to the statewide score.

·    At Grade 5, the District showed no change compared to a statewide gain of 3 percentage points.

·    At Grade 6, the District had a gain of 3 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 3 percentage points.

·    At Grade 7, the District had a loss of 5 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 3 percentage points.

·    At Grade 8, the District had a loss of 3 percentage points compared to no change statewide.

·    At Grade 11, the District had no change compared to a statewide gain of 2 percentage points.

Overall mathematics performance on the PSSA has improved from 2008 to 2010 in grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 11.

In 2011, gains continued in grades 6, 8 and 11. Mathematics scores showed the following changes by grade level:

·    At Grade 3, the District had a loss of 1 percentage point compared to a statewide loss of 1 percentage point.

·    At Grade 4, the District had no change compared to a statewide gain of 1 percentage point.

·    At Grade 5, the District had a loss of 4 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 2 percentage points.

·    At Grade 6, the District had a gain of 7 percentage points compared to no change statewide.

·    At Grade 7, the District had a loss of 3 percentage points compared to no change statewide.

·    At Grade 8, the District had a gain of 11 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 1 percentage point.

·    At Grade 11, the District had a gain of 8 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 1 percentage point.

There is evidence of inconsistent instructional practices across district classrooms, as well as a lack of accountability for the implementation of new learning from Professional Development experiences. It is unclear what standards-based literacy and math instructional practices are implemented with fidelity by district teachers, and due to recent budget cuts, CUSD has few resources (especially people and time) to consistently track implementation. School staff is proficient in understanding data but not yet confident in using it to monitor and adjust instructional practices. Additionally, no time is available within the school day for staff collaboration or in-classroom modeling and coaching as a result of the elimination of Common Planning Time and the positions of school Facilitators (Learning Coaches) due to budget cuts.

Base Line Data

Autism

     FAPE will be provided to students with autism by Highly Qualified Teachers.  As of the 2009-10 school year, 17.7% of students living within the district's boundary are diagnosed as having Autism.  We currently have 24 students attend programs within the school district.  Students who have been diagnosed with Autism who require more intensive programs, attend schools out of district.


Role of Paraeductor/Highly Qualified Teacher

     The State Education Agency must establish and maintain qualifications to ensure that personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including that personnel have the content knowledge and skills to serve children with disabilities.

     No Child Left Behind requires that all public school teachers in core academic subjects be Highly Qualified.  Teachers are generally required to be fully certified and to demonstrate their knowledge.

     The definition of a Highly Qualified Teacher in Pennsylvania: 1) Must hold a bachelor's degree 2) Must have a valid teaching certificate (Instructional I and II or Teacher Intern, but not an Emergency Permit 3) must demonstrate subject matter competency in the core content areas in which providing direct instruction.

      For Paraeducators in Pennsylvania, this means Title I qualifications, No Child Left Behind and paraeducators Credential of Competency must be satisfied in order for district LEAs to prove highly qualified status.  Currently 90% of teachers and 85% of paraeducators are Highly Qualified.

Personnel Development Activities

Topic: AUTISM: Students with disabilities will be provided services by an adequate supply of personnel with the knowledge and skills necessary to meet their needs

Anticipated Training Dates

Training Partners

Training Participants and Audience

Training Format

Evidence of Results

Ongoing Professional Development Dates as follows: 10/11; 11/11; 1/12; 2/12; 3/12; 5/12; 10/12; 11/12; 2/13; 3/13; 5/13; 10/13; 11/13; 2/14; 3/14; 5/14

IU Staff

Parent, New Staff, Paraprofessional, Instructional Staff, Administrative Staff, Related Service Personnel

On-site Training with Guided Practice, Workshops with Joint Planning Periods, Conferences, Distance Learning

2011-2012
100% provision of FAPE

2012-2013
100% provision of FAPE

2013-2014
100% provision of FAPE

 

Topic: ROLE OF PARAEDUCATOR: Paraeducators are required to have 20 hours of staff development annually

Anticipated Training Dates

Training Partners

Training Participants and Audience

Training Format

Evidence of Results

Ongoing Professional Development Dates as follows: 9/09;11/09;9/10;11/10;1/11;2/11;3/11;5/11;10/11;11/11;1/12;2/12;3/12;5/12

PATTAN Staff, IU Staff, Higher Education Staff

New Staff, Paraprofessional, Instructional Staff

Workshops with Joint Planning Periods, Conferences, Distance Learning

100% Highly Qualified Staff

Transition/Post School Outcomes

Reflections

·         PSSA & Teacher Experience

Strength Concern Last Modified: 6/19/2012

PSSA & Teacher Experience

Overall reading performance on the PSSA improved from 2008 to 2010 in grades 4, 6, 7, 8, and 11.

In 2011, gains continued in grades 4 and 6. Reading scores showed the following changes by grade level:

·    At Grade 3, the District showed a loss of 2 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 2 percentage points.

·    At Grade 4, the District had a gain of 3 percentage points compared no change to the statewide score.

·    At Grade 5, the District showed no change compared to a statewide gain of 3 percentage points.

·    At Grade 6, the District had a gain of 3 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 3 percentage points.

·    At Grade 7, the District had a loss of 5 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 3 percentage points.

·    At Grade 8, the District had a loss of 3 percentage points compared to no change statewide.

·    At Grade 11, the District had no change compared to a statewide gain of 2 percentage points.

Overall mathematics performance on the PSSA has improved from 2008 to 2010 in grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 11.

In 2011, gains continued in grades 6, 8 and 11. Mathematics scores showed the following changes by grade level:

·    At Grade 3, the District had a loss of 1 percentage point compared to a statewide loss of 1 percentage point.

·    At Grade 4, the District had no change compared to a statewide gain of 1 percentage point.

·    At Grade 5, the District had a loss of 4 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 2 percentage points.

·    At Grade 6, the District had a gain of 7 percentage points compared to no change statewide.

·    At Grade 7, the District had a loss of 3 percentage points compared to no change statewide.

·    At Grade 8, the District had a gain of 11 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 1 percentage point.

·    At Grade 11, the District had a gain of 8 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 1 percentage point.

There is evidence of inconsistent instructional practices across district classrooms, as well as a lack of accountability for the implementation of new learning from Professional Development experiences. It is unclear what standards-based literacy and math instructional practices are implemented with fidelity by district teachers, and due to recent budget cuts, CUSD has few resources (especially people and time) to consistently track implementation. School staff is proficient in understanding data but not yet confident in using it to monitor and adjust instructional practices. Additionally, no time is available within the school day for staff collaboration or in-classroom modeling and coaching as a result of the elimination of Common Planning Time and the positions of school Facilitators (Learning Coaches) due to budget cuts.

Base Line Data

     Transition to kindergarten for students with disabilities is handled by the Supervisor of Special Education (Elementary).  Meetings are held with Elwyn's Early Intervention Program (Elwyn-Chester Seeds (MAWA)) beginning in January 2011.  All transitions are finalized by February 28th, annually. 

    The established district transition program will be provided for all Special Education students age 14 and older.  Secondary level transition Services are designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement to facilitate movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation.  Beginning no later than the first IEP to be in effect when the student 14, or older the IEP must include:

  •  Postsecondary goals.  Appropriate measurable postsecondary goals based upon age appropriate transition assessments related to training, education, employment, and, where appropriate, independent living skills.
  •  Description of services:  The transition services (including courses of study) needed to assist the student in reaching goals.

Personnel Development Activities

Topic: TRANSITION: Students with disabilities will demonstrate increased ability to successfully make the transitions to school age programs, to work, to post-secondary education and/or adult

Anticipated Training Dates

Training Partners

Training Participants and Audience

Training Format

Evidence of Results

Ongoing Professional Development Dates as follows: 10/11; 11/11; 1/12; 2/12; 3/12; 5/12; 10/12; 11/12; 2/13; 3/13; 5/13; 10/13; 11/13; 2/14; 3/14; 5/14

IU Staff, Community Businesses and Sponsors

Parent, New Staff, Instructional Staff, Administrative Staff, Related Service Personnel

On-site Training with Guided Practice, Workshops with Joint Planning Periods, Conferences, Distance Learning, Job Coach Training, Transition Service Monthly Meetings, Weekly Job Coach Meetings

The Chester Upland School District was targeted as an LEA in sampling year #1 (2011) for Indicator 14 and the Pennsylvania Post School Outcome Survey. It required the completion of the PaPOS Exit Survey for all student leavers (graduates, dropouts, and students who age out during the current academic school year) who have IEPs. The pre-printed PaPOS Surveys were completed and returned to PATTAN. For best practices, these surveys are completed annually at all IEP meetings for exiting seniors. The survey results will serve as an indicator of how many student are transitioning in post-secondary education programs or employment/work.

2011-2012
4% decrease in dropout rate/increase in graduation rate for students who have completed all four years of Transition Program

2012-2013
An additional 4% decrease in dropout rate for students who have completed all four years of Transition Program

2013-2014
An additional 4% decrease in dropout rate for students who have completed all four years of Transition Program

Behavior Support Services

Reflections

·         PSSA & Teacher Experience

Strength Concern Last Modified: 6/19/2012

PSSA & Teacher Experience

Overall reading performance on the PSSA improved from 2008 to 2010 in grades 4, 6, 7, 8, and 11.

In 2011, gains continued in grades 4 and 6. Reading scores showed the following changes by grade level:

·    At Grade 3, the District showed a loss of 2 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 2 percentage points.

·    At Grade 4, the District had a gain of 3 percentage points compared no change to the statewide score.

·    At Grade 5, the District showed no change compared to a statewide gain of 3 percentage points.

·    At Grade 6, the District had a gain of 3 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 3 percentage points.

·    At Grade 7, the District had a loss of 5 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 3 percentage points.

·    At Grade 8, the District had a loss of 3 percentage points compared to no change statewide.

·    At Grade 11, the District had no change compared to a statewide gain of 2 percentage points.

Overall mathematics performance on the PSSA has improved from 2008 to 2010 in grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 11.

In 2011, gains continued in grades 6, 8 and 11. Mathematics scores showed the following changes by grade level:

·    At Grade 3, the District had a loss of 1 percentage point compared to a statewide loss of 1 percentage point.

·    At Grade 4, the District had no change compared to a statewide gain of 1 percentage point.

·    At Grade 5, the District had a loss of 4 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 2 percentage points.

·    At Grade 6, the District had a gain of 7 percentage points compared to no change statewide.

·    At Grade 7, the District had a loss of 3 percentage points compared to no change statewide.

·    At Grade 8, the District had a gain of 11 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 1 percentage point.

·    At Grade 11, the District had a gain of 8 percentage points compared to a statewide gain of 1 percentage point.

There is evidence of inconsistent instructional practices across district classrooms, as well as a lack of accountability for the implementation of new learning from Professional Development experiences. It is unclear what standards-based literacy and math instructional practices are implemented with fidelity by district teachers, and due to recent budget cuts, CUSD has few resources (especially people and time) to consistently track implementation. School staff is proficient in understanding data but not yet confident in using it to monitor and adjust instructional practices. Additionally, no time is available within the school day for staff collaboration or in-classroom modeling and coaching as a result of the elimination of Common Planning Time and the positions of school Facilitators (Learning Coaches) due to budget cuts.

Summarized School District Policy

     The district promotes the cognitive, social, and emotional development of its students.  Its goal is to proactively provide students with opportunities to successfully access an appropriate education and develop social skills that will allow them to successfully integrate into any setting.  Teachers are expected to utilize classroom management strategies that provide the necessary structure and predictability that are necessary in creating positive school environment.  Each teacher is expected to create a classroom management plan with student input so that rules and expectations are meaningful to them.  Each school's plan is comprehensive in nature and demonstrates the initial stages of viewing behavioral infractions as teachable moments that can be used to educate students.  The elementary schools within the district provide character education to students to teach them empathy, respect, cooperation, trustworthiness, integrity, personal responsibility and respect for themselves and others.  Social skills instruction is incorporated into character education to teach all students how to behave appropriately and provide opportunities to celebrate each other for making good choices.  Several additional layers of support are available for students who require more intensive interventions to help them remain in the least restrictive environment.  These include opportunities to problem solve issues with the guidance of social workers, counselors and behavior health liaisons as well as positive solutions identified by the school's Solutions/SAP Team to help each student remain in the least restrictive environment.  In addition, the district has in place Climate Managers at each school to lend positive support to the learning environment.

     Student achievement is celebrated within the character education and all district programs.  The character education program encourages students to build relationships with each other, and repair and restore relationships that are damaged.  Students are provided with the necessary tools to build character, problem solve appropriately, increase self esteem, increase citizenship, and create a sense of belonging.  These opportunities allow students to set, monitor and achieve individual and class goals.  

     Behavioral management strategies and tools, such as Functional Behavioral Assessments, Behavior Intervention Plans and Positive Behavior Plans, self-monitoring strategies, and behavior contracts are utilized when students require individualized behavior plans.  These plans serve as a mechanism to support students who have disabilities and require specific interventions to address behaviors that interfere with learning by utilizing positive reinforcements and techniques.

     The district believes measurable behavioral outcomes are a actual component of education.  To that end, the district requires all teachers, where appropriate, to identify outcomes, chart behavior and utilize data in teaching.  All IEPs and behavior plans will have measurable outcomes.  The Delaware County Intermediate Unit, PaTTAN and attornies representing the school district have assisted with this objective.


School Based Behavioral Health

    
The school district is composed of a Mental Health Team that consists of social worker, counselors, and psychologists.  These individuals play an integral part in creating positive, schoolwide culture and climate.  They provide individual and group support to students who need services as designated in their IEPs, serve as support to classroom teachers, and participate in Solutions/SAP Team meetings to offer their professional expertise in determining therapeutic plans to promote student success.


De-escalation Techniques

    
Some of the techniques that are used by teachers to de-escalate problematic behavior and inappropriate choices include verbal redirection, teacher-student conferences and completion of behavior management sheets (SODAS, Think it Through, Peace Path, and Problem Solving Forms) to allow students to process their problems and conflicts.  Class Council Meetings are incorporated into the districtwide "Getting Along Together Curriculum" to allow students to resolve problems with and seek solutions from their peers in a structured, teacher-directed format.  When these schoolwide, positive behavioral strategies prove ineffective with some students, additional interventions are provided for them.  They may include the following techniques: use of self-regulating charts, deep breathing exercises, mental exercises, mental exercises to reduce frustration, and time with the school social worker, counselor, and psychologist to reflect on situations and role play expected student behavior.  Behavior Intervention Plans are developed for students who have chronic behavior problems whose behavior impedes their learning or the learning of classmates.

Personnel Development Activities

Topic: Positive Behavioral Supports

Anticipated Training Dates

Training Partners

Training Participants and Audience

Training Format

Evidence of Results

Ongoing Professional Development Dates as follows: 10/11; 11/11; 1/12; 2/12; 3/12; 5/12; 10/12; 11/12; 2/13; 3/13; 5/13; 10/13; 11/13; 2/14; 3/14; 5/14

PATTAN Staff, IU Staff, Higher Education Staff, Professional Training Sponsors

Parent, New Staff, Paraprofessional, Instructional Staff, Administrative Staff

On-site Training with Guided Practice, Workshops with Joint Planning Periods, Conferences, Distance Learning

2011-2012
Improvement in student attendance, academic achievement, as measured by PSSA results, and teacher ratings of positive behavior

10% decrease in discipline referrals

10% decrease in suspensions

2012-2013
Improvement in student attendance, academic achievement, as measured by PSSA results, and teacher ratings of positive behavior

An additional 10% decrease in discipline referrals

An additional 10% decrease in suspensions

2013-2014
Improvement in student attendance, academic achievement, as measured by PSSA results, and teacher ratings of positive behavior

An additional 10% decrease in discipline referrals

An additional 10% decrease in suspensions

 

Topic: De-escalation Techniques

Anticipated Training Dates

Training Partners

Training Participants and Audience

Training Format

Evidence of Results

Ongoing Professional Development Dates as follows: 10/11; 11/11; 1/12; 2/12; 3/12; 5/12; 10/12; 11/12; 2/13; 3/13; 5/13; 10/13; 11/13; 2/14; 3/14; 5/14

PATTAN Staff, IU Staff, Higher Education Staff

Parent, New Staff, Paraprofessional, Instructional Staff, Administrative Staff, Related Service Personnel

On-site Training with Guided Practice, Workshops with Joint Planning Periods, Conferences, Study Groups

2011-2012
As a result of training in implementation of de-escalation techniques, student discipline referrals, suspensions and alternative placements will decrease. Independent measures of school climate will indicate semi-annual improvement.

2012-2013
As a result of training in implementation of de-escalation techniques, student discipline referrals, suspensions and alternative placements will decrease. Independent measures of school climate will indicate semi-annual improvement.

2013-2014
As a result of training in implementation of de-escalation techniques, student discipline referrals, suspensions and alternative placements will decrease. Independent measures of school climate will indicate semi-annual improvement.

 

Topic: School-based Behavioral Health

Anticipated Training Dates

Training Partners

Training Participants and Audience

Training Format

Evidence of Results

Ongoing Professional Development Dates as follows: 10/11; 11/11; 1/12; 2/12; 3/12; 5/12; 10/12; 11/12; 2/13; 3/13; 5/13; 10/13; 11/13; 2/14; 3/14; 5/14

PATTAN Staff, IU Staff, Higher Education Staff

New Staff, Paraprofessional, Instructional Staff, Administrative Staff

On-site Training with Guided Practice, Workshops with Joint Planning Periods, Conferences, Distance Learning

2011-2012
Evidence of results in the area will be documented inter-disciplinary team meetings resulting in supervisor approved outcome results and independent measures of school climate.

2012-2013
Evidence of results in the area will be documented inter-disciplinary team meetings resulting in supervisor approved outcome results and independent measures of school climate.

2013-2014
Evidence of results in the area will be documented inter-disciplinary team meetings resulting in supervisor approved outcome results and independent measures of school climate.

Interagency Collaboration (11 P.S. §875.304)

Ensuring FAPE/Hard to Place Students

     When the School District encounters difficulty ensuring FAPE for the particular disability category of Emotional Disturbance, that disturbance typically presents as a complex of multiple psychiatric diagnoses, serious aggression against self and others, chronic elopement/truancy, and non-compliance with treatment being offered by any medical, social, or educational resource.

     The District provides a great deal of support for students their families, and their teachers via its Mental Health Teams of counselors, social workers, and psychologists, who offer individual and group counseling, consultation with parents and teachers, and referral to and ongoing collaboration with outside providers of service.

     Additionally, the District offers a variety of non-traditional educational placements and schedules.  The District has established Solutions/SAP teams in each of its buildings to provide interventions to support any of its struggling students.  Accommodations are also provided using 504 Plans for students as required. 

     The district has enhanced its Emotional Support Programs by providing training to its staff in the areas of social skills instruction, de-escalating the conflict cycle, and positive behavioral strategies to support students.

     The district provides services to Regular and Special Education students who require a smaller, less complicated setting that minimizes transitions.  This program is available for students in 6th -12th grades in our Alternative Education program.

     Ongoing training has been provided to the district's school safety personnel to provide them with appropriate behavioral management strategies that can be used to prevent or de-escalate acting out behaviors amongst students.

     When out of district placements are deemed necessary for a student as determined by his IEP Team, the Out of District Facilitator initiates the search for various placements that may be appropriate for the student.  The school district collaborates with the DCIU, private and approved private schools to ensure that each student receives an education within the appropriate placement.

     The district has frequent inter-agency meetings to provide timely services to students.

Program Profile

Change Type

OPR

Location / Building Name

Building Grade

Building Type

Type of Support

Type of Service

Low Age

High Age

Caseload

Teacher FTE

Change

SD

Chester High School

S

GE

S

ES

14

18

20

1.00

SD

Chester High School

S

GE

S

LS

15

19

20

1.00

SD

Chester High School

S

GE

S

LS

16

20

19

1.00

Change

SD

Chester High School

S

GE

S

LS

14

18

20

1.00

SD

Chester High School

S

GE

S

LS

14

18

19

1.00

Change

SD

Chester High School

S

GE

S

LSS

15

18

20

1.00

Change

SD

Chester High School

S

GE

I

LS

15

18

45

1.00

Change

SD

Chester High School

S

GE

I

LS

15

19

50

1.00

SD

Chester High School

S

GE

S

LS

15

19

19

1.00

Change

SD

Chester High School

S

GE

I

ES

14

18

40

1.00

Change

SD

Science Technology Engineering and Math High School

S

GE

S

LS

15

19

10

0.50

Change

SD

Science Technology Engineering and Math High School

S

GE

I

LS

14

17

50

1.00

Change

SD

Science and Technology High School

S

GE

I

LS

15

18

25

0.50

Change

SD

Showalter Middle School

M

GE

S

LSS

12

14

20

1.00

Change

SD

Showalter Middle School

M

GE

S

LS

12

14

20

1.00

Change

SD

Showalter Middle School

M

GE

S

LS

12

14

20

1.00

Change

SD

Showalter Middle School

M

GE

I

LS

12

14

40

1.00

Change

SD

Toby Farms Elementary School

E

GE

S

LS

6

9

20

1.00

Change

SD

Toby Farms Elementary School

E

GE

S

LS

8

10

20

1.00

Change

SD

Toby Farms Elementary School

E

GE

S

LSS

6

8

20

1.00

Change

SD

Toby Farms Elementary School

E

GE

S

LSS

9

11

20

1.00

Change

SD

Toby Farms Elementary School

E

GE

S

ES

8

11

20

1.00

Change

SD

Toby Farms Middle School

M

GE

S

LS

11

12

20

1.00

Change

SD

Toby Farms Middle School

M

GE

S

LS

12

15

9

1.00

Change

SD

Toby Farms Middle School

M

GE

S

LS

10

13

20

1.00

Change

SD

Toby Farms Middle School

M

GE

S

ES

12

14

20

1.00

Change

SD

Toby Farms Middle School

M

GE

S

AS

11

14

8

1.00

Change

SD

Chester Upland School for the Arts

E

GE

S

LS

8

11

20

1.00

Change

SD

Chester Upland School for the Arts

E

GE

S

LS

6

8

20

1.00

Change

SD

Chester Upland School for the Arts

E

GE

S

AS

7

9

8

1.00

Change

SD

Stetser Elementary

E

GE

S

AS

5

8

8

1.00

Change

SD

Stetser Elementary

E

GE

S

AS

7

9

8

1.00

Change

SD

Stetser Elementary

E

GE

S

AS

9

11

8

1.00

Change

SD

Stetser Elementary

E

GE

S

LS

8

10

20

1.00

Change

SD

All buildings

E

GE

I

SLS

5

11

45

1.00

Change

SD

All buildings

E

GE

I

SLS

5

13

45

1.00

Change

SD

All buildings

M

GE

I

SLS

5

12

25

1.00

Change

SD

Main Street Elementary School

E

GE

S

LS

5

8

20

1.00

Change

SD

Main Street Elementary

E

GE

S

LS

8

11

20

1.00

Support Staff (District)

School District: Chester-Upland SD

ID

OPR

Title

Location

FTE

-

SD

Assistant Superintendent for Pupil Services and Special Education

Administration Building

1.00

-

SD

Supervisors of Special Education

Administration Building

2.00

-

SD

Psychologists

Various Schools

3.00

-

SD

Social Workers

Various Schools

2.00

-

SD

Speech Therapists

Various Schools

4.00

-

SD

Out-of-District Facilitator

Administration Building

1.00

-

SD

Classroom Teaching Assistants

Various Schools

12.00

-

SD

Personal Care Assitants

Various Schools

35.00

-

SD

ACCESS Secretary

Administration Building

1.5

-

SD

Administrative Assistant

Administration Building

1.0

-

SD

Counselors

Various Buildings

3.0

-

SD

Special Project Assistants

Various Buildings

.5

Contracted Support Services

ID

IU / Agency

Title / Service

Amount of Time per Week

-

Pediatric Therapeutic Services

Occupational Therapy

5 Days

-

Pediatric Therapeutic Services

Physical Therapy

12 Hours

-

Delaware County Intermediate Unit

Hearing Support

5 Hours

-

Pediatric Therapeutic Services

Speech/Language Therapy

5 Days

-

Delaware County Intermediate Unit

Vision Support

2 Hours

-

Montgomery County Intermediate Unit

Bilingual Speech and Language Services

1 Hours

-

Sonia Lucas

Bilingual Evaluations

5/y Minutes

-

Staffing Plus

PCA, Bus Aides

50 Hours

-

Delta T

Nursing Services

20 Days

-

Dr. Fanning

Medical Services

10 Hours

-

Pediatric Plus

Medical Services

3 Hours


Assurance for the Operation of Special Education Services and Programs

School Years: 2014 - 2017

The Chester-Upland SD within Delaware County IU 25 assures that the school district will comply with the requirements of 22 Pa. Code Chapter 14 and with the policies and procedures of PDE. PDE will specify, in writing, policies and procedures to be followed. Requests for any deviations from these regulations, standards, policies, and procedures must be made in writing to PDE. The school district understands that special education reports will be approved by PDE in accordance with the following criteria as set forth in 22 Pa. School Code § 14.104:

  1. There are a full range of services, programs and alternative placements available to the school district for placement and implementation of the special education programs in the school district.
  2. The school district has adopted a child find system to locate, identify and evaluate young children and children who are thought to be a child with a disability eligible for special education residing within the school district"s jurisdiction. Child find data is collected, maintained, and used in decision-making. Child find process and procedures are evaluated for its effectiveness. The school district implements mechanisms to disseminate child find information to the public, organizations, agencies, and individuals on at least an annual basis.
  3. The school district has adopted policies and procedures that assure that students with disabilities are included in general education programs and extracurricular and non-academic programs and activities to the maximum extent appropriate in accordance with an Individualized Education Program.
  4. The school district will comply with the PA Department of Education, Bureau of Special Education"s report revision notice process.
  5. The school district follows the state and federal guidelines for participation of students with disabilities in state and district-wide assessments including the determination of participation, the need for accommodations, and the methods of assessing students for whom regular assessment is not appropriate.
  6. The school district assures the Pennsylvania Department of Education that funds received through participation in the medical assistance reimbursement program, ACCESS, will be used to enhance or expand the current level of services and programs provided to students with disabilities in this local education agency.

This assurance must be signed by the School Board President and the Superintendent for the school district to operate services and programs.


_________________________ __________     _________________________ __________
Board President                       Date                 Superintendent                         Date